Seborrheic Keratoses Removal in Toronto

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Seborrheic keratosis is a specific kind of skin growth that mainly appears as people grow older, similar to age spots. Despite these growths causing no harm, they can sometimes be mistaken for melanoma - a perilous form of skin cancer. If you notice a sudden change in your skin, consulting a doctor is advisable.

Seborrheic keratosis is commonly found on the scalp, chest, back, shoulders, abdomen, and face, but it doesn't affect the palms of the hands or soles of the feet. Though harmless, it can be bothersome as it may get caught in clothing or affect one's appearance. However, some individuals might not pursue treatment, either because the growths are covered by clothing or because they are overlooked.

Seborrheic keratoses, while harmless, may be removed for cosmetic purposes. At TMSC, our board-certified plastic surgeons have the expertise to treat these lesions effectively.

Seborrheic keratoses are not dangerous, but can be removed for aesthetic reasons. Here at TMSC we have board certified plastic surgeons who are experienced in treating such lesions.

Seborrheic keratosis. Surgery for skin lesions and minor hand conditions at Toronto Minor Surgery Center (TMSC).
Seborrheic keratosis symptoms. Surgery for skin lesions and minor hand conditions at Toronto Minor Surgery Center (TMSC).

Seborrheic Keratosis Symptoms

Typically, the signs of Seborrheic keratosis involve skin that feels slightly elevated and may start off as tan or light in color, gradually changing over time. The texture can seem waxy, or as if it's been pasted on, and in some cases, it might resemble a wart, which is another type of harmless skin growth. 

The key distinguishing factor between Seborrheic keratosis and a wart is discomfort; warts can be painful, whereas Seborrheic keratosis usually is not. This condition often manifests on parts of the body that receive sun exposure.

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Appearance: Can present as slightly raised and might look as if it’s superficially attached; often has a waxy look.

Size: The size can vary widely, from very small to more than an inch in diameter.

Color: Generally brown, but it can also be yellow, white, or black.

Location: It can develop on any part of the body except for the palms of hands and soles of feet. Commonly affected areas are the chest, shoulders, scalp, back, abdomen, and face.

Additional symptoms: There may be itching involved.

It's important to note that Seborrheic keratosis can be challenging to differentiate from melanoma, a serious form of skin cancer, due to their similar appearances. Any sudden or unexplained changes in your skin warrant a consultation with a healthcare professional. 

The specific causes of seborrheic keratosis remain unknown to the medical community, with no definitive factors identified that lead to its development. However, there seems to be a genetic component, as individuals with a family history of this skin condition are more likely to experience it themselves. Age is also a significant factor, with the likelihood of developing seborrheic keratosis increasing as one gets older. Additionally, sunburn may play a role in the emergence of these growths. Importantly, seborrheic keratoses are not infectious, meaning they cannot be passed from one person to another.

In rare cases, the sudden appearance of multiple seborrheic keratoses may serve as an indicator for certain cancers, such as those affecting the colon or lung, although unrelated to skin cancer. If you notice a sudden growth of multiple seborrheic keratoses on your body, seeking advice from a healthcare professional for further evaluation is crucial.

Seborrheic keratosis causes. Surgery for skin lesions and minor hand conditions at Toronto Minor Surgery Center (TMSC).
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Seborrheic Keratoses Treatment

Seborrheic keratosis treatment in Toronto is typically a straightforward process involving the application of local anesthesia to numb the affected area, followed by a careful shaving of the growth from the skin. This procedure results in a wound akin to a minor scrape, which generally heals quickly.

Often, the desire to treat seborrheic keratoses stems from cosmetic concerns, although fears regarding potential cancer risk are also a common motivator. Some individuals may also seek treatment due to dissatisfaction with their appearance due to these skin growths. However, if medical consultation reveals no cancer risk, treatment might not be necessary unless desired for aesthetic reasons.

Our team comprises well-seasoned and highly skilled surgeons committed to patient care. We guarantee that all procedures are done with precision, attention to aesthetic outcomes, and utmost safety.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a simple and effective method frequently used to treat seborrheic keratoses. It comes with benefits and can be easily conducted in a hospital setting. This approach involves the application of liquid nitrogen to freeze the growth, effectively treating the condition without harming the skin.

Common Surgery

Minor surgery is another option for eliminating seborrheic keratoses, with the specific approach tailored to the growth's size, location, and severity. Our experienced surgeons at TMSC can provide a thorough assessment to determine whether surgery is necessary. In cases with severe skin conditions, a minor surgical procedure may be sufficient for removal.

Important Reminder: TMSC advises against self-treatment of seborrheic keratoses due to the risk of misdiagnosis. There may be complexities that only a healthcare professional can navigate. Therefore, seeking medical advice for proper diagnosis and treatment is essential.

Seborrheic keratosis treatment. Surgery for skin lesions and minor hand conditions at Toronto Minor Surgery Center (TMSC).
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What self-care measures can a person take to manage Seborrheic Keratosis effectively?

Since seborrheic keratosis is benign and causes no harm, specific self-care measures aren't usually necessary unless it starts to cause irritation. It's a common condition you'll likely become accustomed to over time. However, having it evaluated by a healthcare provider is wise, as they can offer advice on managing it on your own if needed.

Is it necessary to have a check-up after treatment for Seborrheic Keratosis?

Our seborrheic keratoses removal in Toronto is usually straightforward, with patients able to return home immediately after. Follow-up visits are rarely necessary, but if any unexpected problems arise, we advise scheduling a follow-up consultation at our clinic.

What steps can I take to reduce discomfort?

If your Seborrheic keratosis bothers you, a simple solution is to cover it with a bandage to prevent rubbing. You can wash the area twice a day with any available soap, but avoid using chemical products without consulting your doctor first. Additionally, you can apply a gentle layer of petroleum jelly to soften the affected area.

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